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  • Today in Legal History: FDR Signs Social Security Act

    From Wikipedia
    On August 15, 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act into law. Responding to the widespread suffering caused by the Great Depression, President Roosevelt asked Congress for “social security” legislation on January 17, 1935. The Act would provide old-age benefits that would be financed by a payroll tax [...]
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  • Today in Legal History: Lincoln Signs the Revenue Act, Imposing First Federal Income Tax

    On August 5, 1861, President Abraham Lincoln signed the Revenue Act, passed by Congress, implementing the first income tax ever levied by the federal government. A month earlier, President Lincoln met with Congress to deal with the national emergency caused by the outbreak of the Civil War.  In an effort to generate the funds necessary [...]
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  • Today in Legal History: Delegates Sign Declaration of Independence

    On August 2, 1776, the Continental Congressional delegates signed the Declaration of Independence, announcing that the thirteen American colonies regarded themselves as independent states and no longer part of the British Colonies. The American colonies formed a new nation, the United States of America. News of the Declaration of Independence [...]
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  • Today in Legal History: President Truman Signs National Security Act

    On July 26, 1947, President Truman signed the National Security Act of 1947, a central document in U.S. Cold War policy. The Act, which took more than a year to craft, directed a major reorganization of the foreign policy and military establishments of the U.S. Government. The Act established the National Security Council (NSC), merged [...]
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  • Today in Legal History: Apollo 11 Mission

    President John F. Kennedy predicted in 1960 that by the end of the decade the country would put a man on the moon and return him home safely.  The triumphant Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, 1969, began an era of moon exploration that has so far gone unrivaled.  American astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin became [...]
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  • Check in with Tilman Larson

    This summer, we would like to share a series of profiles on our former library interns and alumni of Seattle University School Law. We love to hear what they're up to!
    Where do you work and what is your role? I am an associate attorney at the Law Offices of John M. Hyams. My career path to this point has been a non-traditional [...]
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  • Check in with Katie Brown

    This summer, we would like to share a series of profiles on our former library interns and alumni of Seattle University School Law. We love to hear what they're up to!
    Where do you work and what is your role? Charleston School of Law, Deputy Director of the Law Library What do you enjoy most about your job? That it is different [...]
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  • Today in Legal History: Truman Orders U.S. Troops to Korea

    On June 27, 1950, President Truman ordered U.S. Air and Naval forces to join forces with South Korea’s army in order to prevent the communist conquest of the independent nation.  Two days earlier, 90,000 communist troops of the North Korean Army invaded South Korea, prompting a U.N. Security Council emergency meeting and the call for [...]
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  • Today in Legal History: Statue of Liberty Arrives in New York

    The Statue of Liberty arrived in New York Harbor on June 19, 1885. The statue was a gift from France to the United States commemorating the centennial of the American Declaration of Independence. The 151-foot statue, Liberty Enlightening the World, was designed by Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi, and was dismantled into 350 pieces to be transported [...]
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  • This Crim Law Q&A could be yours!

    Crim Law Q&A
    Welcome to all of our new 1Ls taking Criminal Law this summer! We're so excited to have you here and look forward to seeing you in the library. Librarians are available to help you with your research needs and circulation staff is here until midnight daily. The library has many different study aids for you to borrow, but wouldn't [...]
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