Archive for February, 2013

  • The Case of the Spit Burger

    Because the Washington Product Liability Act does not provide for damages for emotional distress in the absence of physical injury, a federal judge dismissed a case against Burger King for negligence, product liability and vicarious liability that had been filed by a Clark County deputy sheriff, Edward Bylsma. In March 2009, the sheriff drove his […] Read more...
  • Legal Research Apps

    Finding legal resources has never been easier or more mobile. There are many free legal research apps for iOS (iPad, iPhone) and Android devices, and many more available for a small price. Three of the best reference apps for on-the-go lawyers and law students are Fastcase, WestlawNext, and HeinOnline. While the desktop version of Fastcase […] Read more...
  • Check it Out: Proteus

    Set in 18th century South Africa, Proteus is a fictionalized account of the interracial gay love story of two men incarcerated on the infamous South African Robin Island. One is a black prisoner, Claas Blank, and the other a Dutch sailor, Rijkhaart Jacobsz. Both men were charged and placed on trial for sodomy. The film explores both the theme of racism […] Read more...
  • 2012 Year-End Report on the Federal Judiciary

    Curious about the Judiciary budget? Want to know how many cases were filed in the United States Supreme Court last year? This report describes the cost containment efforts of the Judiciary, and presents data about caseloads. Read more...
  • One Dollar President Coins

    In honor of President’s Day, we look at the Presidential $1 Coin Program. Initiated by the Presidential Coin Act of 2005, minting and distribution was suspended in 2011 due to excessive inventory. So if you want you McKinley, Teddy Roosevelt, Taft or Wilson coin, you will need to work directly with the U.S. Mint. Read more...
  • Check it Out: The Hurricane

    World middleweight boxing champion Rubin “Hurricane” Carter’s dreams of winning the middleweight title were destroyed when he was wrongfully convicted of murder and sentenced to life in prison. In prison Carter published his autobiography “The Sixteenth Round,” which inspired several people to come to his aid and find the evidence needed to prove his innocence. […] Read more...
  • Federal Judiciary 2012 Year-End Report

    He starts by reminiscing about the USS Constitution, but much of his commentary is on the fiscal health of the US court system. You can read Chief Justice John Roberts’ 2012 Year-End Report on the Federal Judiciary yourself if you are so inclined. An appendix to the report provides caseload statistics for the various federal […] Read more...
  • Lincoln’s Law Practice: The Resource

    The Oscar-nominated movie, Lincoln, portrays the 16th President’s political life leading up to the Emancipation Proclamation and the passage of the 13th Amendment (banning slavery in all U.S. states and territories) by the 38th Congress. Prior to assuming the Presidency, Lincoln had an active law practice in Illinois representing a wide variety of clients. Now, […] Read more...
  • Russian Action on Adoptions May Thwart a Bilateral Treaty

    Russian President Vladimir Putin recently signed into law a bill which bans the adoption of Russian children by U.S. citizens. The Russian government’s action may portend the denunciation of a bilateral treaty on the subject which entered into force for both states on November 1, 2012. The U.S., which encouraged Russia to join the Hague […] Read more...
  • Check it Out: A Time to Kill

    The film version of John Grisham’s novel A Time to Kill is set in a small, racially divided Mississippi town. A ten-year-old black girl is brutally raped and left for dead by two white men. She survives and is able to identify them. The girl’s father, Carl Lee Hailey (Samuel L. Jackson), fearing an acquittal […] Read more...