Archive for May, 2014

  • Free Washington Probate Forms

    Hopefully, you never have to probate a will — unless that is your chosen area of law practice.  However, if you are a novice and do have to do a probate, check out this website that provides free advice and forms.  It is not the most visually pleasing site but the content is useful and […] Read more...
  • Gifts for Law Grads

    With graduation nearing, it is gift giving season.  For Counsel is an online boutique specializing in gifts for lawyers (which translates into law graduates).  You can find desktop accessories, “productivity tools,” clothing and other kinds of gifts–scales of justice abound.  Or . . . you can just give cash.  But don’t forget your law grad. Read more...
  • Today in Legal History: Memorial Day

    Memorial Day, initially called Decoration Day, was first observed on May 30, 1868, to honor the Civil War soldiers who died in battle by decorating their graves. While Memorial Day was celebrated in the years following 1868, it was not declared a national holiday until 1971 when Congress declared it be celebrated on the last […] Read more...
  • Happy Trails to Two of SU’s Law Librarians

    Librarians Kristin Cheney and Bob Menanteaux are retiring at the end of this academic year.  Kristin is the Associate Dean for Library and Educational Technology and has worked at the law school for more then 20 years.  Bob is an Informational Services Librarian with specialization in international law and has worked at SU for more […] Read more...
  • New Library Director

    Seattle University School of Law is pleased to announce the promotion of Kara Phillips to Law Library Director, effective July 1, 2014.  Kara has been the Associate Library Director at SU Law for several years and has extensive knowledge of the collection, budget and personnel of the library.  She also understands the many idiosyncrasies of […] Read more...
  • Today in Legal History: Norway’s Constitution Day

    Syttende Mai (May 17th) is Norway’s Constitution Day. Norway had been a part of the Danish Autocracy for 400 years, and on May 17, 1814, Norway signed the constitution that declared the country an independent nation. The Norwegian Parliament held the first Syttende Mai celebration in 1836—even though they would not become fully independent until […] Read more...
  • Justice Scalia Gets His Facts Wrong??

    In what Berkley law professor Daniel Farber termed a “cringeworthy mistake” Justice Scalia attributed the position of the trucking industry to the EPA is his dissent in the EPA v. EME Homer City Generation L.P. case. From the Volohk Conspiracy website: “Case Western Reserve University law professor Jonathan H. Adler notes the irony. “The worst […] Read more...
  • Recommended Reading from the Walkover Collection: Ben Fountain, Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk

    The Walkover collection is located on the 2nd floor of the library under the staircase.  Ben Fountain, Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk, (Ecco 2012)  LAW-Walkover Collection (2nd Floor)  PS3606.O844B55 2012  (National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction 2012) “Though the shellshocked humor will likely conjure comparisons with Catch-22 and Slaughterhouse Five, the debut novel by […] Read more...
  • Fire to Paper: Mark Calderon’s Pyrographic Prints

    On the west wall by the Reference stacks are three pyrograph prints by local artist Mark Calderon: Loyola (1994), representing St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuit order; Purisma (1994), meaning ‘most pure,’ showcases an image of the Virgin Mary; Mandorla (1995) depicts the Virgin of Guadalupe surrounded by a golden aura.  More […] Read more...
  • Email Updates from Washington Courts

    The Washington Courts’ website contains quite a bit of useful information including court rules, cases, forms and more. You can also sign up for email alerts from the site. You can choose what you’d like to get, including notifications of changes to court rules and/or jury instructions. Read more...