Today in Legal History: Elton John wins Defamation Suit

On November 4, 1993, the award-winning singer won a $518,000 (£350,000) defamation claim against the Daily Mirror for publishing a false article about his eating habits. The transcript of the appeals case, John v. MGN LTD, reveals that on appeal, the award for exemplary damages was reduced because the newspaper did not attack Mr. John‘s reputation as an artist.

With roots stretching back to the Roman Empire, defamation is a tort which is steeped in common law history. While Mr. John sued in Great Britain, many of the elements of defamation are the same in our legal system. Available to students and library patrons, The Making of Modern Law is an excellent database for researching historic common law doctrine. The database contains over 21,000 legal treatises covering a period between 1800 and 1926.

On a more practical note, those interested in the size of jury verdicts in should check out this link to a site maintained by the UW Law Library. The site lists a number of Westlaw and Lexis databases containing information on jury awards. Those without access to Lexis or Westlaw need not fret. There are a number of free print resources on jury awards that are available at both the SU and UW Law Libraries. One excellent, continuously updated, print resource for jury awards is Northwest Personal Injury Litigation Reports,  available in the reserve section of the SU Law Library.

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