Archive for the ‘Featured Resource’ Category

  • Out, Proud and Old: Advocating for LGBT Seniors

    Social Justice Monday—March 6, 2015 Submitted by Justin Abbasi, Law Library Intern Growing attention has been paid to the needs of the aging baby boomer generation and there has been a shift in policies and attitudes toward the LGBT population, but little attention has been given to the intersection of these two groups: elderly people […] Read more...
  • Kids Caught in the Middle: Parents, Prison, and the Dependency System

    Social Justice Monday – March 30, 2015 Submitted by Justin Abbasi, Law Library Intern In 2013, there were more than 5,000 dependency cases in Washington State. Parental rights were terminated in nearly 2,000 of those cases. Except in extremely rare cases, parental termination is permanent and cannot be appealed. Some parental termination cases involve horrifying abuse […] Read more...
  • $15.00 an Hour: A Math Problem, a Political Problem or a Poverty Problem?

    Social Justice Monday—March 23, 2015 Submitted by Justin Abbasi, Law Library Intern Last spring, the Seattle City Council voted unanimously to raise the minimum wage in Seattle to $15.00 an hour. This increase will take place over a period of three to seven years depending on the size of the business, whether the business provides […] Read more...
  • Baseball and the Law

    It’s almost Spring and with it, Spring Training for Major League Baseball. So what does that have to do with law? Apparently, quite a bit. Disbelievers can look at “Baseball and the American Legal Mind,” a book in our library (KF 3989.A75B37 on the 4th floor). It collects a number of law review articles tying […] Read more...
  • If You’re Exploring Constitutional Law, Consider Turning to a Libguide

    America’s constitutional history is ridden with conflicts, innovations, and complexities. Referring to treatises is an effective way to research questions of constitutional law. The Seattle University Law Library has a new libguide that will help students locate primary and secondary materials related to U.S. constitutional law. Written by Law Library Intern Justin Abbasi, it features […] Read more...
  • Incarcerated and Street Youth

    Social Justice – March 9, 2015 Submitted by Justin Abbasi, Law Library Intern It sometimes feels ‘easier’ to talk about reforming the juvenile justice system than the criminal justice system or of meeting the legal needs of children instead of adults – children can be a sympathetic demographic. But what about those children and youth […] Read more...
  • Fending Off the Sharks: The Fight to Keep Consumer Protections in Payday Lending

    Social Justice Monday – March 2, 2015 Submitted by Justin Abbasi, Law Library Intern Would you take out a loan with an APR of 391%? That’s what thousands of low and moderate income people end up having to do to cover unexpected expenses like car repairs and medical bills. Because they have bad or no […] Read more...
  • The Rule Against Perpetuities explained?

    Do you think the Rule Against Perpetuities is complicated? The rule is only a sentence or so but people have had difficulty interpreting it for more than a century. John Chipman Gray wrote an entire treatise on the rule. The 1915 edition has more than 700 pages. If you are inclined to look at a […] Read more...
  • Poverty Traps in Criminalized Communities: A Life Sentence of Debt and Unemployment

    Social Justice Monday – February 23, 2015 Submitted by Justin Abbasi, Law Library Intern There is a national crisis regarding policing, prosecution and imprisonment of low-income communities of color and sexual minorities. The events surrounding the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner have drawn attention to the criminalization of minority communities and the economic […] Read more...
  • SU Law School Alumni Magazine

    The Lawyer is the law school’s official magazine published for alumni and friends of the school. Its name has changed over the years — Puget Sound Lawyer, Seattle Lawyer —  but now it is simply, The Lawyer. There are archived copies on SU’s digital commons website. If you’re an alum (or a someday alum) and […] Read more...