Library

1 Million Downloads!

The Seattle University School of Law Digital Commons is the institutional repository of Seattle University School of Law. It is designed to provide centralized open access to our scholarship, activities, publications,and history. The repository hit one million downloads over the weekend, with over 300,000 of those downloads occurring in the past year alone!

Faculty Scholarship

Access faculty scholarship published in the Seattle University Law Review, the Seattle Journal for Social Justice, and other selected publications.

Centers, Programs, and Events

A showcase of the activities of our centers and institutes, as well as special law school events.

Law School Publications

Included in this collection is The Lawyer, which is the official magazine of Seattle University School of Law, and is published for alumni and friends of the law school.

Student Publications and Programs

There are three official student-run legal periodicals: Seattle Journal of Environmental Law, Seattle Journal for Social Justice and Seattle University Law Review. The student members participate in writing assignments and the editorial process thereby improving their writing skills and research techniques.

Law School Archives

The archives will house materials about the law school’s history and legacy. Stay tuned for additional photographs, documents, and video footage. Check out the collection READ Posters featuring our faculty members!

April 24 – 30 Preservation Week!

The American Library Association website has info about Preservation Week. Preservation is a core responsibility of libraries. Library collections need to be cared for. Otherwise, books will fall apart or other calamities will occur. Taking care of the things we have is important, so is preserving the past. Preservation and the past has a special place in law libraries. Laws are among the many things law libraries preserve; state laws and regulations are always being replaced, updated, and transformed. There are many laws that deal with preservation too; here are a couple resources to help you enter this important area of law:

Historic Preservation Law in a Nutshell by Sara C. Bronin & Ryan Rowberry
Available at SU Law Library LAW-Reserve (KF4310.B76 2014)

The Antiquities Act: A Century of American Archaeology, Historic Preservation, and Nature Conservation by David Harmon, Francis P. McManamon, & Dwight T. Pitcaithley
Available at SU Law Library LAW-4th Floor (KF4310.A96 2006)

April is Poetry Month!

The D. A. was ready His case was red-hot. 

Defendant was present His witness was not.

He prayed one day’s delay From His honor the judge. 

But his plea was not granted The Court would not budge.

So the jury was empanelled All twelve good and true

But without his main witness What could the twelve do?

Brown v State, 134 Ga.Ct.App. 771, 771-772, 216 S.E.2d 356 (1975) by Judge Evans. In the footnotes to the case, the judge explains that the decision was written in rhyme because a Senior Judge of the Superior Courts had demanded (at a party) that if the writer ever reversed another one of his decisions, the opinion be written in poetry. Judge Evans goes on to say “it was no easy task to write the opinion in rhyme”.

For legal poetry in the Seattle University Law Library, try:

For a law review article written as a poem, see Gary Dubin, The Ballad of Leroy Powell, 16 UCLA L. Rev. 139 (1968).

Cell Phone Use

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The library staff understands that your connection to family, friends, and employers is vital when you are at school, but we also ask that you be courteous to your classmates and set your cell phones to vibrate or at the lowest setting while you are in the library.  If you need to take a phone call, please conduct cell phone conversations outside the library.  Talking in the stairwells is particularly troublesome as voices carry throughout all the floors.

Chemerinsky visiting SU Law on April 19

Erwin Chemerinsky is visiting SU Law as part of the Influential Voices lecture series. Chemerinsky is the dean of UC-Irvine Law School and is also a familiar name to law students because he wrote the textbook used in many constitutional law courses across the nation as well as the popular companion Constitutional Law: Principles and Policies, which we have in our law library (LAW-Reserve (KF4550.C427 2015).

Chemerinsky is presenting his new book The Case Against the Supreme Court on Tuesday, April 19 in Sullivan Hall Room C5 at Noon. A book signing and reception will follow.

The Case Against the Supreme Court is Chemerinsky’s eighth book. Released prior to the passing of Justice Antonin Scalia, in this book Chemerinsky argues for term limits and a reassessment of the institution. He is very critical of the Court and uses many examples to point out the how the justices are fallible and the Court’s opinions are often flawed.

 

Want to catch up on Chemerinsky before the big event, check out these books in our library:

Enhancing Government: Federalism for the 21st Century
Available at SU Law Library LAW-4th Floor (KF4600.C48 2008)

The Conservative Assault on the Constitution
Available at SU Law Library LAW-4th Floor (KF4550.C426 2010)

If you’re interested in Constitutional Law, you should also check out our LibGuide on the topic!

April 10-16, 2016 is National Library Week

This week, Seattle University Law Library joins libraries in schools, campuses and communities nationwide in celebrating National Library Week. First sponsored in 1958, National Library Week is a national observance sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA) and libraries across the country to highlight the value of libraries and library personnel and to promote library use and support.

The 2016 National Library Week theme is “Libraries Transform.” Knowing how to use a law library gives you power. Power over legal research transforms into the strongest arguments in your favor from precedent. It allows you to leverage the knowledge of experts to understand the law through secondary sources.

Interested in learning more about how law libraries transform? Check out:

Law Librarianship in the Twenty-First Century edited by Roy Balleste, Sonia Luna-Lamas, and Lisa Smith-Butler
Available at SU Law Library LAW-4th Floor (Z675.L2L38375 2014). Publisher’s Description:

Law Librarianship in the 21st Century, a text for library and information science courses on law librarianship, introduces students to the rapidly evolving world of law librarianship. With no prior knowledge of the law required, students using this book will find practical answers to such questions as: What is law librarianship? How do you become a law librarian? How does law librarianship interrelate with the legal world? Individual chapters provide a concise treatment of such specialized topics as the history of law librarianship, international law, and government documents. Standard topics are dealt with as they apply to the law library, including collection development, public services, technical processing, administration, technology, and consortia. The textbook also includes an explanation of the common acronyms and special terminology needed to work in a law library.

Noise Level

Throughout the academic year and as we get closer to finals, students seek quiet areas to study, free of ringing phones and personal conversations. Keep in mind that voices carry in study rooms (even when doors are closed) so please be considerate. The 4th floor is a designated quiet study zone.

Bring Your ID Card to Access the Law Library on Evenings and Weekends

library swipeAll law students are required to swipe their SU ID cards after 8pm Monday through Thursday and on Sunday card swipes are required from 7am – 10am and after 4pm. The ID card swipe policy increases security and law student priority in the library.

Library Access Policy

While law students, faculty and staff are Seattle University Law Library’s main constituents, please note that the Law Library is open to all Seattle University faculty, staff, students, and alumni who are engaged in research or studies that require the use of legal material.  Circulation privileges are limited to Seattle University faculty, staff, currently enrolled students, or alumni who purchase library memberships.

Members of the general public can purchase a $5 day pass for access to the Library with no circulation privileges.  Additionally, members of the general public have full access to the United States government documents acquired by the Library through its membership in the Federal Depository Library Program.  All non-law school patrons must show identification at the Circulation Desk and complete the “Visitors’ Registration Form.”

During reading and examination periods, access to the Law Library is limited to law students, alumni, faculty, and researchers with specific collection needs.  The Seattle University Law Library access policy is posted on our website at: http://www.law.seattleu.edu/x3174.xml.

If you have questions about access or unauthorized patrons, please contact the Law Library Circulation staff on the 2nd floor of the library.  Campus public safety can also be contacted: x5990 (non-emergency) or x5911 (emergency).

Read a Good Book Lately?

rec reading

Need a break from reading legal textbooks?  On the main floor of the law library (near the stairs) is the law library’s recreational reading collection. The collection has an eclectic assortment of fiction and non-fiction and includes recent best sellers, mysteries and cookbooks.

Featured Book from the Recreational Reading Collection

Dave Eggers, The Circle (Alfred A. Knopf, 2013) LAW-McNaughton Collection (2nd Floor)   PS3605.G48C57 2013

“Most of us imagine totalitarianism as something imposed upon us—but what if we’re complicit in our own oppression? That’s the scenario in Eggers’ ambitious, terrifying, and eerily plausible new novel. When Mae gets a job at the Circle, a Bay Area tech company that’s cornered the world market on social media and e-commerce, she’s elated, and not just because of the platinum health-care package. The gleaming campus is a wonder, and it seems as though there isn’t anything the company can’t do (and won’t try). But she soon learns that participation in social media is mandatory, not voluntary, and that could soon apply to the general population as well. For a monopoly, it’s a short step from sharing to surveillance, to a world without privacy. This isn’t a perfect book—the good guys lecture true-believer Mae, and a key metaphor is laboriously explained—but it’s brave and important and will draw comparisons to Brave New World and 1984. Eggers brilliantly depicts the Internet binges, torrents of information, and endless loops of feedback that increasingly characterize modern life. But perhaps most chilling of all is his notion that our ultimate undoing could be something so petty as our desperate desire for affirmation.” Starred Review (Review by Keir Graff from Booklist via Amazon)