Noise Level

Throughout the academic year and as we get closer to finals, students seek quiet areas to study, free of ringing phones and personal conversations. Keep in mind that voices carry in study rooms (even when doors are closed) so please be considerate. The 4th floor is a designated quiet study zone.

Bring Your ID Card to Access the Law Library on Evenings and Weekends

library swipeAll law students are required to swipe their SU ID cards after 8pm Monday through Thursday and on Sunday card swipes are required from 7am – 10am and after 4pm. The ID card swipe policy increases security and law student priority in the library.

Library Access Policy

While law students, faculty and staff are Seattle University Law Library’s main constituents, please note that the Law Library is open to all Seattle University faculty, staff, students, and alumni who are engaged in research or studies that require the use of legal material.  Circulation privileges are limited to Seattle University faculty, staff, currently enrolled students, or alumni who purchase library memberships.

Members of the general public can purchase a $5 day pass for access to the Library with no circulation privileges.  Additionally, members of the general public have full access to the United States government documents acquired by the Library through its membership in the Federal Depository Library Program.  All non-law school patrons must show identification at the Circulation Desk and complete the “Visitors’ Registration Form.”

During reading and examination periods, access to the Law Library is limited to law students, alumni, faculty, and researchers with specific collection needs.  The Seattle University Law Library access policy is posted on our website at:

If you have questions about access or unauthorized patrons, please contact the Law Library Circulation staff on the 2nd floor of the library.  Campus public safety can also be contacted: x5990 (non-emergency) or x5911 (emergency).

Read a Good Book Lately?

rec reading

Need a break from reading legal textbooks?  On the main floor of the law library (near the stairs) is the law library’s recreational reading collection. The collection has an eclectic assortment of fiction and non-fiction and includes recent best sellers, mysteries and cookbooks.

Featured Book from the Recreational Reading Collection

Dave Eggers, The Circle (Alfred A. Knopf, 2013) LAW-McNaughton Collection (2nd Floor)   PS3605.G48C57 2013

“Most of us imagine totalitarianism as something imposed upon us—but what if we’re complicit in our own oppression? That’s the scenario in Eggers’ ambitious, terrifying, and eerily plausible new novel. When Mae gets a job at the Circle, a Bay Area tech company that’s cornered the world market on social media and e-commerce, she’s elated, and not just because of the platinum health-care package. The gleaming campus is a wonder, and it seems as though there isn’t anything the company can’t do (and won’t try). But she soon learns that participation in social media is mandatory, not voluntary, and that could soon apply to the general population as well. For a monopoly, it’s a short step from sharing to surveillance, to a world without privacy. This isn’t a perfect book—the good guys lecture true-believer Mae, and a key metaphor is laboriously explained—but it’s brave and important and will draw comparisons to Brave New World and 1984. Eggers brilliantly depicts the Internet binges, torrents of information, and endless loops of feedback that increasingly characterize modern life. But perhaps most chilling of all is his notion that our ultimate undoing could be something so petty as our desperate desire for affirmation.” Starred Review (Review by Keir Graff from Booklist via Amazon)

1L Information

We met many of the new students during the recent library 1L orientation, but if you were unable to attend, here is a summary of some of the most important things we covered:

Library Survival Guide
If you need information about law school in general, briefing a case, or outlining, consult our new student guide at

Study Aids

The library has a variety of study aids located in our reserve section including: Nutshells, Hornbooks, Examples and Explanations, Emanuel Law Outlines and Gilbert Law Summaries.  For specific titles see our Finding Study Aids Guide at:

The library maintains one copy of each required first year casebook in the Reserve area for two-hour check-out (no overnight checkouts).  The first year casebook collection is to be used for quick reference or limited photocopying and is not intended to be a substitute for purchasing casebooks.  The library does not purchase copies of required supplementary materials/handouts or upper division course materials.  

Study Rooms

Study rooms can be reserved for your study group.  It’s a two hour maximum per day per group.  For more information, visit: and click on the links under Study Rooms and Equipment Requests.

Reference Help

reference help

Reference librarians can help with any aspect of legal research—finding sources, searching databases, and understanding search results.  If you have a reference question, please stop by the reference desk, call us at 206-398-4225 or email us at   We welcome your questions.

Our reference team consists of:

If you have a reference question, you can contact any of the above librarians directly.  Our reference desk hours are as follows:  Evening reference is offered Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 8:30 am until 8:00 pm and Thursdays and Fridays from 8:30 am until 4:30 pm. On Sunday afternoons from noon to 4:00 pm, we will provide reference services via email ( ).  We look forward to working with you throughout the year.

Law Library Reconfiguration


Returning law students will notice changes in the library.  The area behind the Reference Desk has been made into office space for the law school’s four journals.  Books that had been shelved in the Reference stacks have been relocated to various parts of the library based on their currency and usage.  In addition, the large study room on the 4th floor has been divided into two smaller study rooms.  Hopefully, the law students will be happy with the changes.

New Student Information

This guide is a must read for those who are new to law school or for those who are still confused about anything in the library, from the card security system to how to reserve a study room!

Study rooms available again

20150713_190705Construction on rooms 400 and 401 are now complete!  You are able to reserve these study rooms online.

Study Room Policy:

The law library study rooms are for law student discussion groups only.

TWO HOURS PER DAY PER GROUP LIMIT. To make a reservation, you may select up to four 30-minute blocks (two hours) at once on the grid, then click “Continue” to proceed to the next step.

Reservations MUST BE CONFIRMED within 30 minutes by selecting the link sent to your valid SeattleU e-mail address.

Rooms not occupied within ten minutes of reserved time may be re-assigned.

Groups are limited to reserving study rooms for one continuous 2-hour block per day.

2nd Floor Library Renovations

20150712_140124Please note that the renovation of the second floor south end of the Law Library for the relocation of the Student Publications space has been completed.  Thank you for your patience during this process!