Library

New and Notable – Shari’a in the Secular State: Evolving Meanings of Islamic Jurisprudence in Turkey

Cover ImageShari’a in the Secular State: Evolving Meanings of Islamic Jurisprudence in Turkey

Russell Powell, Associate Provost for Global Engagement, Professor of Law

Words in both law and religion can shape power relationships and are often highly disputed. Shari`a lies within the overlap of these two spheres and provides a unique subject for the study of meaning in that liminal space. This book contributes important insights related to Islamic jurisprudence and secularism in the Turkish context and regarding the role of language in contested legal and religious contexts.

The study begins by providing a historical framework for the ideas and terms covered, including concepts of religion in general, Shari`a in particular, and secularism in the Turkish state. It goes on to examine empirical research to describe and analyze contemporary Turkish understandings of religion and Shari`a. The author’s research indicates that there is often a disconnect between supporting the adoption of Shari`a and supporting the regulation of everyday behavior through civil codes. Thus, “Shari`a” seems to have taken on new meanings as groups have sought either to appropriate or criticize it. It is a quintessential example of fractured and contextual meaning at the center of both religious and legal traditions.

This book is essential reading for both academics and those interested in law, linguistics, history, political science, anthropology, sociology, religious studies, or Near Eastern studies. – From the Publisher


 

New Walkover Collection Title: The Secret of Magic

The Secret of Magic / Deborah Johnson.

Winner of the 2015 Harper Lee Prize for fiction.

“As a child, Regina was captivated by Calhoun’s The Secret of Magic, a novel in which white and black children played together in a magical forest. The book was a sensation, featured on the cover of Time magazine, and banned more than any other book in the South. And then M.P. Calhoun disappeared. With Thurgood’s permission, Regina heads down to Mississippi to find Calhoun and investigate the case. But as she navigates the muddy waters of racism, relationships, and her own tragic past, she finds that nothing in the South is as it seems.” –publisher

Deborah Johnson found motivation to write this novel by recalling the racially unjust experiences of her beloved grandfather and his deep admiration for Thurgood Marshall. She is the author of The Air Between Us, which received the Mississippi Library Association award for fiction. The author also worked for many years in Rome, Italy as a translator and editor of doctoral theses and at Vatican Radio.


 

New Walkover Collection Title: The Sellout

The Sellout / Paul Beatty.

Winner of the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award in Fiction

“A biting satire about a young man’s isolated upbringing and the race trial that sends him to the Supreme Court, Paul Beatty’s The Sellout showcases a comic genius at the top of his game. It challenges the sacred tenets of the United States Constitution, urban life, the civil rights movement, the father-son relationship, and the holy grail of racial equality—the black Chinese restaurant.” –publisher

Paul Beatty is the author of the novels, Tuff, Slumberland and The White Boy Shuffle, and the poetry collections Big Bank Take Little Bank and Joker, Joker, Deuce. He was the editor of Hokum: An Anthology of African-American Humor.


 

New Walkover Collection Title: Preparation for the Next Life

Preparation for the Next Life / Atticus Lish.

Winner of the 2015 Penn/Faulkner award.

Author Atticus Lish brings forth his readers’ empathy and understanding while unravelling this story wrought with difficult truths. … “Preparation for the Next Life is a document of the undocumented and an unlikely love story between a Chinese Muslim immigrant, Zou Lei, and a traumatized Iraq War veteran, Skinner. [The book] forces readers to look squarely at a host of the failures plaguing contemporary American society.” (Penn/Faulkner award review, 4/7/15).

In creating this attention worthy novel, author Atticus Lish referenced his “brief” tour of duty with the Marines and his passion for teaching/studying the Chinese language.


 

New Walkover Collection Title: Fortune Smiles

Fortune Smiles / Adam Johnson.

Winner of the 2015 National Book Award for fiction.

In his Wall Street Journal interview (8/15/15) Adam Johnson related, “I’ve always been interested in fiction that delivers new worlds, and building them is one of the great pleasures I take from writing.” In Fortune Smiles he does indeed offer “new” insight, along with a rich, quality reading experience. … Subtly surreal, darkly comic, both hilarious and heartbreaking, [this book] is a major collection of stories that gives voice to the perspectives we don’t often hear, while offering something rare in fiction: a new way of looking at the world. Unnerving, riveting, and written with a timeless quality, these stories confirm Johnson as one of America’s greatest writers and an indispensable guide to our new century.” –Amazon

A recipient of many esteemed fiction awards, Adam Johnson also won the Pulitzer Prize for his previous novel, The Orphan Master’s Son.


 

Chemerinsky visiting SU Law on April 19

Erwin Chemerinsky is visiting SU Law as part of the Influential Voices lecture series. Chemerinsky is the dean of UC-Irvine Law School and is also a familiar name to law students because he wrote the textbook used in many constitutional law courses across the nation as well as the popular companion Constitutional Law: Principles and Policies, which we have in our law library (LAW-Reserve (KF4550.C427 2015).

Chemerinsky is presenting his new book The Case Against the Supreme Court on Tuesday, April 19 in Sullivan Hall Room C5 at Noon. A book signing and reception will follow.

The Case Against the Supreme Court is Chemerinsky’s eighth book. Released prior to the passing of Justice Antonin Scalia, in this book Chemerinsky argues for term limits and a reassessment of the institution. He is very critical of the Court and uses many examples to point out the how the justices are fallible and the Court’s opinions are often flawed.

 

Want to catch up on Chemerinsky before the big event, check out these books in our library:

Enhancing Government: Federalism for the 21st Century
Available at SU Law Library LAW-4th Floor (KF4600.C48 2008)

The Conservative Assault on the Constitution
Available at SU Law Library LAW-4th Floor (KF4550.C426 2010)

If you’re interested in Constitutional Law, you should also check out our LibGuide on the topic!


 

New and Notable – Enduring Conviction: Fred Korematsu and His Quest for Justice

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Enduring Conviction: Fred Korematsu and His Quest for Justice

Lorraine K. Bannai, Professor of Lawyering skills and Director, Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality

KF228.K59B36 2015

Fred Korematsu’s decision to resist F.D.R.’s Executive Order 9066, which provided authority for the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, was initially the case of a young man following his heart: he wanted to remain in California with his white fiancée. However, he quickly came to realize that it was more than just a personal choice; it was a matter of basic human rights.

After refusing to leave for incarceration when ordered, Korematsu was eventually arrested and convicted of a federal crime before being sent to the internment camp at Topaz, Utah.

He appealed his conviction to the Supreme Court, which, in one of the most infamous cases in American legal history, upheld the wartime orders. Forty years later, in the early 1980s, a team of young attorneys resurrected Korematsu’s case. This time, Korematsu was victorious, and his conviction was overturned, helping to pave the way for Japanese American redress.

Lorraine Bannai, who was a young attorney on that legal team, combines insider knowledge of the case with extensive archival research, personal letters, and unprecedented access to Korematsu his family, and close friends. She uncovers the inspiring story of a humble, soft-spoken man who fought tirelessly against human rights abuses long after he was exonerated. In 1998, President Bill Clinton awarded Korematsu the Presidential Medal of Freedom. – From the Publisher


 

New and Notable Non-Fiction Books from the McNaughton Recreational Reading Collection

Located on the 2nd floor of library at the base of the stairs.

Jon Krakauer Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town (Double Day 2015) LAW-McNaughton Collection (2nd Floor) HV6568.M57K73 2015

In May 2012, Jezebel posted an article, “My Weekend in America’s So-Called ‘Rape Capital,’” referring to Missoula, Montana, though both the writer of that article and Krakauer (Three Cups of Deceit: How Greg Mortenson, Humanitarian Hero, Lost His Way, 2011, etc.) note that the rate of reported rapes in Missoula was commensurate with the rates in other college towns. Given the fanatic devotion for the Grizzlies, the university’s football team, and the fact that its players were accused of both gang and one-on-one rapes, Krakauer finds in Missoula the perfect storm of scandal. (In fact, some locals like to believe that football players don’t need to rape anyone because they can have sex with whomever they’d like.) The author homes in on the stories of several victims: one whose assailant was convicted, one whose wasn’t, and another whose crime was punished by expulsion from the university—though he was never found legally guilty (one revealing thread of Krakauer’s investigations is the appalling ineptitude of university administrators when confronted with accusations of rape among their students). The author focuses on the plight of a brave undergrad who, after considerable trepidation, decided to go public with her accusation against star player Beau Donaldson. Krakauer has done considerable research into acquaintance rape, and his recounting of trials, both legal and university proceedings, is riveting. His focus on quoting from testimony means that it is harder for readers to understand the motivations of someone like Kirsten Pabst, a former prosecutor who became a lawyer for an accused football player; an interview with her could have been useful. A raw and difficult but necessary read. (Review from Kirkus Reviews)

Andrew Lawler Why Did the Chicken Cross the World? The Epic Saga of the Bird that Powers Civilization (Atria Books 2014) LAW-McNaughton Collection (2nd Floor) SF487.7.L28 2014

Today, there are more than 20 billion chickens, an astonishing number, admits Andrew Lawler, a contributing writer for Science magazine and freelance journalist. “Add up the world’s cats, dogs, pigs, and cows and there would still be more chickens.” Wondering how it is that such a bird has become so ubiquitous in so many manifestations (from McNuggets to occupying Col. Sanders’ buckets), the author embarked on an epic journey of his own to libraries and universities (where he interviewed various authorities on the bird), cockfights in the Philippines, the jungles of Vietnam, the factory farms now processing the birds for mass consumption, and the animal rights activist who keeps but does not eat her chickens. Lawler also takes readers on a trip into deep history, showing us the natural history of the bird, the difficulties archaeologists have with them (their bones do not often survive long sojourns in the ground), and the religious significance of, especially, the rooster. Lawler examined the chicken carcasses that Darwin studied, and he quotes a Hamlet sentry who mentions a rooster. He tells about some long-ago uses of bird parts—e.g., the dung of a rooster could cure an ulcerated lung. We learn about weathervanes and how the bird has been roosting in our language: “chicken” (coward), “cock” (well, you know) and others. The author instructs us about chicken sexual unions and about the intricacies of the egg, and he eventually arrives at the moral question: Why do we treat these birds with such profound cruelty? He also acknowledges that chickens’ waste and demands on our resources are nothing like those of pigs and cows. A splendid book full of obsessive travel and research in history, mythology, archaeology, biology, literature and religion. (Review from Kirkus Reviews)


 

New and Notable: Just mercy : a story of justice and redemption

Just mercy : a story of justice and redemption.
New Books KF373.S74A3 2015

“A powerful true story about the potential for mercy to redeem us, and a clarion call to fix our broken system of justice.  Just Mercy is at once an unforgettable account of an idealistic, gifted young lawyer’s coming of age, a moving window into the lives of those he has defended, and an inspiring argument for compassion in the pursuit of true justice.  Author  Brian Stevenson is the executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama, and a professor of law at New York University Law School. He has won relief for dozens of condemned prisoners, argued five times before the Supreme Court, and won national acclaim for his work challenging bias against the poor and people of color. He has received numerous awards, including the MacArthur Foundation ‘Genius’ Grant.” – from the publisher


 

New and Notable: International Environmental Law and the Global South

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International Environmental Law and the Global South

Edited By:
Shawkat Alam, Macquarie University Law School
Sumudu Atapattu, University of Wisconsin Law School
Carmen G. Gonzalez, Seattle University School of Law
Jona Razzaque, University of the West of England, Bristol

K3585.I5775 2015

The unprecedented degradation of the planet’s vital ecosystems is among the most pressing issues confronting the international community. Despite the proliferation of legal instruments to combat environmental problems, conflicts between rich and poor nations (the North-South divide) have compromised international environmental law, leading to deadlocks in environmental treaty negotiations and noncompliance with existing agreements. This volume examines both the historical origins of the North-South divide in European colonialism as well as its contemporary manifestations in a range of issues including food justice, energy justice, indigenous rights, trade, investment, extractive industries, human rights, land grabs, hazardous waste, and climate change. Born out of the recognition that global inequality and profligate consumerism present threats to a sustainable planet, this book makes a unique contribution to international environmental law by emphasizing the priorities and perspectives of the global South. – From the Publisher