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Chemerinsky visiting SU Law on April 19

Erwin Chemerinsky is visiting SU Law as part of the Influential Voices lecture series. Chemerinsky is the dean of UC-Irvine Law School and is also a familiar name to law students because he wrote the textbook used in many constitutional law courses across the nation as well as the popular companion Constitutional Law: Principles and Policies, which we have in our law library (LAW-Reserve (KF4550.C427 2015).

Chemerinsky is presenting his new book The Case Against the Supreme Court on Tuesday, April 19 in Sullivan Hall Room C5 at Noon. A book signing and reception will follow.

The Case Against the Supreme Court is Chemerinsky’s eighth book. Released prior to the passing of Justice Antonin Scalia, in this book Chemerinsky argues for term limits and a reassessment of the institution. He is very critical of the Court and uses many examples to point out the how the justices are fallible and the Court’s opinions are often flawed.

 

Want to catch up on Chemerinsky before the big event, check out these books in our library:

Enhancing Government: Federalism for the 21st Century
Available at SU Law Library LAW-4th Floor (KF4600.C48 2008)

The Conservative Assault on the Constitution
Available at SU Law Library LAW-4th Floor (KF4550.C426 2010)

If you’re interested in Constitutional Law, you should also check out our LibGuide on the topic!

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New and Notable – Enduring Conviction: Fred Korematsu and His Quest for Justice

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Enduring Conviction: Fred Korematsu and His Quest for Justice

Lorraine K. Bannai, Professor of Lawyering skills and Director, Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality

KF228.K59B36 2015

Fred Korematsu’s decision to resist F.D.R.’s Executive Order 9066, which provided authority for the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, was initially the case of a young man following his heart: he wanted to remain in California with his white fiancée. However, he quickly came to realize that it was more than just a personal choice; it was a matter of basic human rights.

After refusing to leave for incarceration when ordered, Korematsu was eventually arrested and convicted of a federal crime before being sent to the internment camp at Topaz, Utah.

He appealed his conviction to the Supreme Court, which, in one of the most infamous cases in American legal history, upheld the wartime orders. Forty years later, in the early 1980s, a team of young attorneys resurrected Korematsu’s case. This time, Korematsu was victorious, and his conviction was overturned, helping to pave the way for Japanese American redress.

Lorraine Bannai, who was a young attorney on that legal team, combines insider knowledge of the case with extensive archival research, personal letters, and unprecedented access to Korematsu his family, and close friends. She uncovers the inspiring story of a humble, soft-spoken man who fought tirelessly against human rights abuses long after he was exonerated. In 1998, President Bill Clinton awarded Korematsu the Presidential Medal of Freedom. – From the Publisher

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New and Notable Non-Fiction Books from the McNaughton Recreational Reading Collection

Located on the 2nd floor of library at the base of the stairs.

Jon Krakauer Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town (Double Day 2015) LAW-McNaughton Collection (2nd Floor) HV6568.M57K73 2015

In May 2012, Jezebel posted an article, “My Weekend in America’s So-Called ‘Rape Capital,’” referring to Missoula, Montana, though both the writer of that article and Krakauer (Three Cups of Deceit: How Greg Mortenson, Humanitarian Hero, Lost His Way, 2011, etc.) note that the rate of reported rapes in Missoula was commensurate with the rates in other college towns. Given the fanatic devotion for the Grizzlies, the university’s football team, and the fact that its players were accused of both gang and one-on-one rapes, Krakauer finds in Missoula the perfect storm of scandal. (In fact, some locals like to believe that football players don’t need to rape anyone because they can have sex with whomever they’d like.) The author homes in on the stories of several victims: one whose assailant was convicted, one whose wasn’t, and another whose crime was punished by expulsion from the university—though he was never found legally guilty (one revealing thread of Krakauer’s investigations is the appalling ineptitude of university administrators when confronted with accusations of rape among their students). The author focuses on the plight of a brave undergrad who, after considerable trepidation, decided to go public with her accusation against star player Beau Donaldson. Krakauer has done considerable research into acquaintance rape, and his recounting of trials, both legal and university proceedings, is riveting. His focus on quoting from testimony means that it is harder for readers to understand the motivations of someone like Kirsten Pabst, a former prosecutor who became a lawyer for an accused football player; an interview with her could have been useful. A raw and difficult but necessary read. (Review from Kirkus Reviews)

Andrew Lawler Why Did the Chicken Cross the World? The Epic Saga of the Bird that Powers Civilization (Atria Books 2014) LAW-McNaughton Collection (2nd Floor) SF487.7.L28 2014

Today, there are more than 20 billion chickens, an astonishing number, admits Andrew Lawler, a contributing writer for Science magazine and freelance journalist. “Add up the world’s cats, dogs, pigs, and cows and there would still be more chickens.” Wondering how it is that such a bird has become so ubiquitous in so many manifestations (from McNuggets to occupying Col. Sanders’ buckets), the author embarked on an epic journey of his own to libraries and universities (where he interviewed various authorities on the bird), cockfights in the Philippines, the jungles of Vietnam, the factory farms now processing the birds for mass consumption, and the animal rights activist who keeps but does not eat her chickens. Lawler also takes readers on a trip into deep history, showing us the natural history of the bird, the difficulties archaeologists have with them (their bones do not often survive long sojourns in the ground), and the religious significance of, especially, the rooster. Lawler examined the chicken carcasses that Darwin studied, and he quotes a Hamlet sentry who mentions a rooster. He tells about some long-ago uses of bird parts—e.g., the dung of a rooster could cure an ulcerated lung. We learn about weathervanes and how the bird has been roosting in our language: “chicken” (coward), “cock” (well, you know) and others. The author instructs us about chicken sexual unions and about the intricacies of the egg, and he eventually arrives at the moral question: Why do we treat these birds with such profound cruelty? He also acknowledges that chickens’ waste and demands on our resources are nothing like those of pigs and cows. A splendid book full of obsessive travel and research in history, mythology, archaeology, biology, literature and religion. (Review from Kirkus Reviews)

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New and Notable: Just mercy : a story of justice and redemption

Just mercy : a story of justice and redemption.
New Books KF373.S74A3 2015

“A powerful true story about the potential for mercy to redeem us, and a clarion call to fix our broken system of justice.  Just Mercy is at once an unforgettable account of an idealistic, gifted young lawyer’s coming of age, a moving window into the lives of those he has defended, and an inspiring argument for compassion in the pursuit of true justice.  Author  Brian Stevenson is the executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama, and a professor of law at New York University Law School. He has won relief for dozens of condemned prisoners, argued five times before the Supreme Court, and won national acclaim for his work challenging bias against the poor and people of color. He has received numerous awards, including the MacArthur Foundation ‘Genius’ Grant.” – from the publisher

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New and Notable: International Environmental Law and the Global South

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International Environmental Law and the Global South

Edited By:
Shawkat Alam, Macquarie University Law School
Sumudu Atapattu, University of Wisconsin Law School
Carmen G. Gonzalez, Seattle University School of Law
Jona Razzaque, University of the West of England, Bristol

K3585.I5775 2015

The unprecedented degradation of the planet’s vital ecosystems is among the most pressing issues confronting the international community. Despite the proliferation of legal instruments to combat environmental problems, conflicts between rich and poor nations (the North-South divide) have compromised international environmental law, leading to deadlocks in environmental treaty negotiations and noncompliance with existing agreements. This volume examines both the historical origins of the North-South divide in European colonialism as well as its contemporary manifestations in a range of issues including food justice, energy justice, indigenous rights, trade, investment, extractive industries, human rights, land grabs, hazardous waste, and climate change. Born out of the recognition that global inequality and profligate consumerism present threats to a sustainable planet, this book makes a unique contribution to international environmental law by emphasizing the priorities and perspectives of the global South. – From the Publisher
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New and Notable: Trial Advocacy

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Trial Advocacy: Planning, Analysis, and Strategy

Marilyn J. Berger, Professor Emeritus
John B. Mitchell, Professor
Ronald H. Clark, Distinguished Practitioner in Residence

KF8915.B47 2015

“Trial Advocacy: Planning, Analysis, and Strategy 4th Edition provides the experience and approach to thinking, planning, and performing as a practicing lawyer. The book presents a wide range of practice situations and fosters the kinds of analytic processes and skills needed to perform trial work. Today’s lawyer must be fluent with technology for case organization and courtroom presentation, as well as with alternative forms of dispute resolution. The book provides these new tools while retaining the trial lawyer skills that remain very much the same as they have throughout the history of the legal profession.

Trial Advocacy: Planning, Analysis, and Strategy, 4th Edition, is divided into 14 chapters. Each chapter covers a separate trial subject area—persuasion, jury selection, opening statement, objections, and so on. Each chapter presents a theoretical and practical approach to the particular skill that is the subject of that chapter, provides illustrations of practice as applied to hypothetical situations, and offers a series of practical and strategic pointers in the subject area.  Each chapter also includes a checklist of skills dealt with in the chapter.

Accompanying the book are Assignments, which take students through the trial process in the context of the criminal and civil cases, both of which arise from a tavern shooting after which the victim dies. The assignments are intended for role-play in professional workshops and legal education advocacy classes.” – From the publisher

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New and Notable: Mea Culpa

cover imageMea Culpa: Lessons on Law and Regret from U.S. History
Steven W. Bender, Professor of Law and Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development

SU Law Library LAW-Display (KF4749.B39 2015 )

“In Mea Culpa, Steven W. Bender examines how the United States’ collective shame about its past has shaped the evolution of law and behavior. We regret slavery and segregationist Jim Crow laws. We eventually apologize, while ignoring other oppressions, and our legal response to regret often fails to be transformative for the affected groups. By examining policies and practices that have affected the lives of groups that have been historically marginalized and oppressed, Bender is able to draw persuasive connections between shame and its eventual legal manifestations. Analyzing the United States’ historical response to its own atrocities, Bender identifies and develops a definitive moral compass that guides us away from the policies and practices that lead to societal regret.

Mea Culpa challenges its readers. In a different era, might we have been slave owners or proprietors of a racially segregated establishment? It’s easy to judge immorality in the hindsight of history, but what current practices and policies will later generations regret?

More than a historical survey, this volume offers a framework for resolving some of the most contentious social problems of our time. Drawing on his background as a legal scholar, Bender tackles immigration, the death penalty, the war on terror, reproductive rights, welfare, wage inequity, homelessness, mass incarceration, and same-sex marriage. Ultimately, he argues, it is the dehumanization of human beings that allows for practices to occur that will later be marked as regrettable. And all of us have a stake in standing on the side of history that resists dehumanization.”

From the publisher

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New Walkover collection titles – fiction

Take time in your busy academic schedule for some non-law, thought provoking reading. Each won coveted literary awards. Enjoy!

lilaPS3568.O3125L55 2014

From the publisher:  “Revisiting the beloved characters and setting of [author] Robinson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Gilead and Home, Lila is a moving expression of the mysteries of existence that is destined to become an American classic.  [It is] … an unforgettable story of girlhood lived on the fringes of society in fear, awe, and wonder.”  This book was a 2014 National Book Award finalist and won the 2014 National Book Critics Circle Award.

 

redeploymentPS3611.L4423A6 2014

From the publisher: “Taking readers to the front lines of the war in Iraq and back, [author Phil Klay’s] Redeployment asks us to understand what happened there and what happened to soldiers who returned. Whether in the combat zone of on the home front, they face life at extremely, where happy stories and easy answers provide no guidance or comfort.” This book won the 2014 National Book Award for Fiction and the John Leonard First Book Prize. It was also selected as one of the best books of the year by The New York Times Book ReviewTimeNewsweekThe Washington Post Book World, and Amazon.

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New Walkover collection titles – legal mysteries

For a great reading escape, take time to enjoy these thrilling legal mysteries. New to the Walkover collection, each was listed as a #1 New York Times bestseller.

witnessThe fifth witness: a novel by Michael Connelly.
PS3553.O51165F55 2011

From the publisher: “Mickey Haller has fallen on tough times. Criminal defense in Los Angeles has virtually dried up, and he has had to expand his business into foreclosure defense. But just when Mickey thinks criminal court is in his rearview mirror one of his new clients is accused of killing the banker she blames for trying to take away her home. … Now despite the growing danger, the lawyer is ready to mount the best defense of his career.”

 

By John Grisham:

confessionThe confession: a novel.
PS3557.R5355C66 2011

From the publisher: “He buried her body so that it would never be found, then watched in amazement as police and prosecutors arrested and convicted Donté Drumm, a local football star, and marched him off to death row. Nine years have passed. Travis has just been paroled in Kansas for a different crime; Donté is four days away from his execution. Travis suffers from an inoperable brain tumor. For the first time in his miserable life, he decides to do what’s right and confess. But how can a guilty man convince lawyers, judges, and politicians that they’re about to execute an innocent man?”

sycamoreSycamore row: a novel.
PS3557.R5355S93 2014

From the publisher: “Now we return to Ford County as Jake Brigance finds himself embroiled in a fiercely controversial trial that exposes a tortured history of racial tension:  Before he hangs himself from a sycamore tree, [Seth] Hubbard leaves a new, handwritten will. It is an act that drags his adult children, his black maid, and Jake into a conflict as riveting and dramatic as the murder trial that made Brigance one of Ford County’s most notorious citizens, just three years earlier. The second will raises many more questions than it answers. Why would Hubbard leave nearly all of his fortune to his maid? Had chemotherapy and painkillers affected his ability to think clearly? And what does it all have to do with a piece of land once known as Sycamore Row?”

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New and Notable: Speaking of Language and Law

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Speaking of Language and Law

Edited By:
Lawrence Solan
Janet Ainsworth, John D. Eshelman Professor of Law
Roger W. Shuy

K213.S665 2015

Among the most prominent scholars of language and law is Peter Tiersma, a law professor at Loyola Law School with a doctorate in linguistics (co-editor of The Oxford Handbook of Language and Law). Tiersma’s significant body of work traverses a variety of legal and linguistic fields. This book offers a selection of twelve of Tiersma’s most influential publications, divided into five thematic areas that are critical to both law and linguistics: Language and Law as a Field of Inquiry, Legal Language and its History, Language and Civil Liability, Language and Criminal Justice, and Jury Instructions. Each paper is accompanied by a brief commentary from a leading scholar in the field, offering a substantive conversation about the ramifications of Tiersma’s work and the disagreements that have often surrounded it. – From the Publisher

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