Archive for the ‘other’ Category

  • John McKay Headed to Palestine

    John McKay, former US Attorney, has been with SU Law school since 2007. He teaches very popular courses on National Security Law and the Constitutional Law of Terrorism. He also works with the externship program and helps students connect with attorneys, judges and other leaders in the legal profession. He will be moving to Ramallah […] Read more...
  • Washington State Library to follow the Blue Angels?

    It is big news in Seattle that federal budget cuts have caused cancellation of the Blue Angels’ annual visit to Seafair. In a similar vein, state budget cuts may impact another local institution: the Washington State Library. In recent decades, the library has been moved off of the Capitol campus. Budget constraints threaten additional changes. […] Read more...
  • April is Poetry Month!

    National Poetry Month was started in 1996 by the American Academy of Poets, to be celebrated in April. For more information, check out the American Academy of Poets, home of the “Poem of the Day.” Poetry often makes its way into legal opinions. Here is an example: No evidence had I taken Sua sponte appeared […] Read more...
  • Something about Fools and the Legal World

    Sure there are plenty of foolish aspects to the law, but this April Fool’s posting is about foolscap. Foolscap is (among more obvious things) a type of paper used in writing and printing. It’s longer dimensions made it antiquity’s equivalent to today’s legal paper. Read the first paragraph of chapter 10 in Charles Dickens’s Bleak […] Read more...
  • Who is Paying Taxes and How Much?

    There are many claims about who is paying taxes and how much they pay.  As far as individuals and federal income tax, you can look at the statistics yourself. You can sort by state, tax rate and other characteristics.  Judge for yourself rather than relying on the talking heads at Fox News or the Huffington […] Read more...
  • One Dollar President Coins

    In honor of President’s Day, we look at the Presidential $1 Coin Program. Initiated by the Presidential Coin Act of 2005, minting and distribution was suspended in 2011 due to excessive inventory. So if you want you McKinley, Teddy Roosevelt, Taft or Wilson coin, you will need to work directly with the U.S. Mint. Read more...
  • “Jailbreaking” No Longer Legal

    January 26, 2013, was the deadline for legally unlocking your cellphone without the permission of the carrier.  Although “jailbreaking” or unlocking cell phones was outlawed by the enactment of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act in 1998, there has been a temporary exemption that allowed users to unlock phones owned or purchased prior to January 26, […] Read more...
  • Roe v. Wade 40 Years Later

    On January 22, 1973, the Supreme Court published its decision in Roe v. Wade, making most early term abortions a constitutional right. Although abortion rights issues continue to divide Americans over forty years after the decision, a report  published this month by the Pew Research Center concludes that the public remains opposed to overturning the […] Read more...
  • The Wall Street Journal’s Law Blog

    This blog highlights cases, trends, and personalities of interest to the business community. Read more...
  • Apps, Apps, and More Apps!

    Our friends at the UCLA Law Library compiled and described apps of interest to lawyers and law school students. Their list includes apps for legal news and research, law school, bar exam study, productivity, and, last of all, fun. Read more...