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  • Today in Legal History: U.S. Term Limits v. Thornton

    The state of Arkansas imposed term limitations through Amendment 73, a ballot measure that prohibited the listing of any person who served the maximum terms allowed in the U. S. House or Senate on the general election ballot. Soon after the measure was adopted in 1992, Bobbie Hill, the League of Women Voters, and U.S. Representative Ray [...]
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  • Today in Legal History: Norway’s Constitution Day

    Syttende Mai (May 17th) is Norway’s Constitution Day. Norway had been a part of the Danish Autocracy for 400 years, and on May 17, 1814, Norway signed the constitution that declared the country an independent nation. The Norwegian Parliament held the first Syttende Mai celebration in 1836—even though they would not become fully

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  • Legal Research Tune Up 2017

    The Seattle University and Lane Powell law firm law libraries are pleased to offer a legal research workshop to help students brush up on their legal research skills for their summer employment or other summer research endeavors. The workshop will cover state and federal legislative history, regulations, and practice materials using a [...]
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  • Today in Legal History: First White House Bowling Alley Opens

    Truman opened the first White House bowling alley on April 25, 1947. It was a birthday present from his friends. Truman’s first frame was 7 pins (out of 10). One of these pins is now on exhibition with the Smithsonian. Truman wasn’t much of a bowler, and didn’t use the facility much, but White House employees did. White House employees, [...]
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  • Today in Legal History: Shakespeare Born

    “The first thing we do, let’s kill all the lawyers.” – 2 King Henry IV, 2 The exact date of Shakespeare’s birth is not known, but based on available evidence, April 23, 1564 was his probable birthday. Admittedly, historians also like the date because Shakespeare died on the same day. Many of Shakespeare’s plays concerned [...]
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  • Today in Legal History: Earth Day

    Before 1970 there were no legal or regulatory devices to protect the environment. In the spring of 1970, Senator Gaylord Nelson, inspired by the student anti-war movement, created Earth Day as a way to force environmental protection onto the national political agenda. On April 22, 1970, Earth Day was observed by millions of Americans [...]
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  • Today in Legal History: Bay of Pigs Invasion

    History.com
   
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  • Today in Legal History: First Presidential Veto

    George Washington was the first president to use his veto power.  On April 5, 1792, he vetoed a bill regarding apportioning representatives in the House which would have increased the number of seats for northern states. More information is available at:
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  • Today in Legal History: April Fool’s Day

    Nobody is sure how April Fool’s Day got started, but the most common theory is the changing of the calendar from the Julian to the Gregorian in France in 1564. The Julian calendar, based on lunar cycles, celebrated the New Year in April. The Gregorian calendar, based on the sun, celebrated the New Year on January 1st. Not everyone was [...]
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