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  • Today in Legal History: First White House Bowling Alley Opens

    Truman opened the first White House bowling alley on April 25, 1947. It was a birthday present from his friends. Truman’s first frame was 7 pins (out of 10). One of these pins is now on exhibition with the Smithsonian. Truman wasn’t much of a bowler, and didn’t use the facility much, but White House employees did. White House employees, [...]
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  • Today in Legal History: Shakespeare Born

    “The first thing we do, let’s kill all the lawyers.” – 2 King Henry IV, 2 The exact date of Shakespeare’s birth is not known, but based on available evidence, April 23, 1564 was his probable birthday. Admittedly, historians also like the date because Shakespeare died on the same day. Many of Shakespeare’s plays concerned [...]
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  • Today in Legal History: Earth Day

    Before 1970 there were no legal or regulatory devices to protect the environment. In the spring of 1970, Senator Gaylord Nelson, inspired by the student anti-war movement, created Earth Day as a way to force environmental protection onto the national political agenda. On April 22, 1970, Earth Day was observed by millions of Americans [...]
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  • Today in Legal History: Bay of Pigs Invasion

    History.com
   
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  • Today in Legal History: First Presidential Veto

    George Washington was the first president to use his veto power.  On April 5, 1792, he vetoed a bill regarding apportioning representatives in the House which would have increased the number of seats for northern states. More information is available at:
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  • Today in Legal History: April Fool’s Day

    Nobody is sure how April Fool’s Day got started, but the most common theory is the changing of the calendar from the Julian to the Gregorian in France in 1564. The Julian calendar, based on lunar cycles, celebrated the New Year in April. The Gregorian calendar, based on the sun, celebrated the New Year on January 1st. Not everyone was [...]
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  • Today in Legal History: Woman Lawyer’s Bill Passed in California

    Through the efforts of Clara Shortridge Foltz and Laura deForce Gordon, the words “white male” were replaced with “person” in the state requirements to take the bar exam.  This had the effect of not only allowing women to take the bar, but minorities as well.  Ms. Foltz, the single parent of five children, went on that fall [...]
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  • Today in Legal History: Beer & Wine Revenue Act Signed

    The Beer & Wine Revenue Act was signed by Franklin Roosevelt on March 22, 1933.  No fan of prohibition, President Roosevelt signed the Act in order to levy a federal tax on alcoholic beverages to raise federal revenue to get our nation out of the Great Depression.  Later that year, in December 1933, the 21st Amendment ending Prohibition, [...]
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  • Today in Legal History: Roosevelt Signs Lend-Lease Program

    The Lend-Lease program was Franklin Roosevelt’s way to circumvent US laws requiring that all sales to foreign governments be made in cash.  Roosevelt strongly believed that the Allied powers needed help.  This program was met with skepticism; some of the provisions of the bill permitted the President to shut down strikes.  However, [...]
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