Posts Tagged ‘art’

  • Library Artwork: M.J. Anderson’s “Column of Light”

    One of the most visible pieces of art in the library is M.J. Anderson’s sculpture, Column of Light (2000), at the base of the stairs on the 2nd floor.  Commissioned specifically by the Seattle University Law School in 2000, the statue was first carved from marble in Carrara, Italy, before arriving in the Law Library. […] Read more...
  • Copyright and Fair Use: The Second Circuit Decides Cariou v. Prince and the Gagosian Gallery

    On 4/25/2013 the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit mostly overturned a lower court opinion on the nature of appropriation, the importance of transformative use and the protection of works of art under the federal copyright statutes. The 2011 federal district court case had found that artist Richard Prince’s appropriation of photographs […] Read more...
  • Art Appreciation 101

    If you like art, visit the following galleries on campus: Hedreen Gallery Kinsey Gallery Vachon Galler Also, check out the wonderful artwork at Seattle University Law Library. Read more...
  • Portraits in the Law Library

    In addition to the caricatures and engravings in study room 306, the library is also home to three more traditional portraits of important figures in legal history: Judge Thomas Burke, St Thomas More, and Justice John Marshall.  Read more...
  • Lynn Di Nino’s “Salmon Swimming Upstream”

    Tucked away in the administrative offices of the library is a large piece by local Tacoma artist Lynn Di Nino. Made of various fabrics depicting a common Northwest scene—the yearly struggle of salmon making their way upstream—Di Nino, a self-taught artist who utilizes many different mediums in her works. She enjoys sculpting animals because she […] Read more...
  • “The Great Human Race: The Counselors”

    John L. Doyle’s “The Great Human Race: The Counselors” (1985) series is difficult to miss in the library. Comprised of ten pieces, each color lithograph is accompanied by a monochrome copy as well as a brief explanation of the cultural symbols and history at work in each piece. “The Counselors” series seeks to visually represent […] Read more...
  • Political and Judicial Caricatures

    British newspapers from the Edwardian and Victorian eras are full of scandalous trials, giving the defendants and lawyers involved a certain celebrity status. Like modern tabloids, the newspaper reports captivated the public’s imagination through stories of intrigue, love, violence, and especially murder. The magazine Vanity Fair, which is still in print today, often published caricatures […] Read more...
  • Art of the Alaska Reading Room

    On the 4th floor of the library is the Alaska Reading Room, which exhibits documents instrumental to Alaska’s petition to become the 49th state. Photos and letters have been donated by Mary and George Sundborg, parents of Seattle University president, Father Stephen Sundborg. George Sundborg was an important advocate for the Alaska statehood movement. On […] Read more...
  • M.J. Anderson’s “Column of Light”

    One of the most visible pieces of art in the library is M.J. Anderson’s sculpture, Column of Light (2000), at the base of the stairs on the 2nd floor. Commissioned specifically by the Seattle University Law School in 2000, the statue was first carved from marble in Carrara, Italy, before arriving in the Law Library. […] Read more...
  • Fire to Paper: Mark Calderon’s Pyrographic Prints

    On the west wall by the Reference stacks are three pyrograph prints by local artist Mark Calderon: Loyola (1994), representing St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuit order; Purisma (1994), meaning ‘most pure,’ showcases an image of the Virgin Mary; Mandorla (1995) depicts the Virgin of Guadalupe surrounded by a golden aura. Calderon […] Read more...