Supreme Court Nominations in the SU Law Library

Are you interested in learning about the President’s judicial nominations to the US Supreme Court? Look no further than the Seattle U law library. The first book is written by Seattle University’s own Professor Andrew Siegel!

The Supreme Court Sourcebook by Richard H. Seamon, Andrew Siegel, Joseph Thai, & Kathryn A. Watts
Available at SU Law Library LAW-Reserve (Faculty Collection) (KF8742.S425 2013). Publisher’s Description:

The Supreme Court Sourcebook provides carefully selected, edited, and analyzed materials on the Court, including academic literature, historical materials, internal court documents, Court filings, and judicial opinions. The flexible organization suits a variety of courses. An online component keeps the book current and interesting, with ready-to-use materials in pending cases for advocacy and opinion-writing simulations. The combined package gives professors a turnkey solution for teaching a theoretical course (examination of the Supreme Court as an institution), a hands-on course (simulations of oral argument and opinion writing in pending cases), or any custom combination in between.

Supreme Court Nominations: Presidential Nomination, the Judiciary Committee, Proper Scope of Questioning of Nominees, Senate Consideration, Cloture, and the use of the Filibuster by Denis Steven Rutkus
Available at SU Law Library LAW-4th Floor (KF8742.S87 2009). Publisher’s Description:

The process of appointing Justices has undergone changes over two centuries, but its most basic feature–the sharing of power between the President and Senate–has remained unchanged. To receive lifetime appointment to the Court, a candidate must first be nominated by the President and then confirmed by the Senate. Although not mentioned in the Constitution, an important role is played midway in the process (after the President selects, but before the Senate considers) by the Senate Judiciary Committee. Since the end of the Civil War, almost every Supreme Court nomination received by the Senate has first been referred to and considered by the Judiciary Committee before being acted on by the Senate as a whole. This book explores the appointment process–from Presidential announcement, Judiciary Committee investigation, confirmation hearings, vote, and report to the Senate, through Senate debate and vote on the nomination.

Strategic Selection: Presidential Nomination of Supreme Court Justices from Herbert Hoover through George W. Bush by Christine L. Nemacheck
Available at SU Law Library LAW-4th Floor (KF8742.N46 2007). Publisher’s Description:

The process by which presidents decide whom to nominate to fill Supreme Court vacancies is obviously of far-ranging importance, particularly because the vast majority of nominees are eventually confirmed. But why is one individual selected from among a pool of presumably qualified candidates? In Strategic Selection: Presidential Nomination of Supreme Court Justices from Herbert Hoover through George W. Bush, Christine Nemacheck makes heavy use of presidential papers to reconstruct the politics of nominee selection from Herbert Hoover’s appointment of Charles Evan Hughes in 1930 through President George W. Bush’s nomination of Samuel Alito in 2005. Bringing to light firsthand evidence of selection politics and of the influence of political actors, such as members of Congress and presidential advisors, from the initial stages of formulating a short list through the president’s final selection of a nominee, Nemacheck constructs a theoretical framework that allows her to assess the factors impacting a president’s selection process.