Writing a Paper this Semester?

Here are some common questions and answers:

Corporations

So you decided to take Business Entities this semester and you’re feeling a burning desire to know more about corporate law, or maybe more about Washington-specific corporate law? This research guide, by Kelly Kunsch, is packed with everything you need, from where to find forms for corporate formation to useful journals relating to corporate law (check out the Securities Regulation Law Journal for possible vacation reading!) or where to find Washington corporation registrations online.

Administrative Law

Written by Tina Ching, this research guide provides an introduction to Washington and Federal administrative codes and processes.  It is useful for general administrative law issues and questions, and features a number of secondary sources which can help you explore the subject further.

Featured Database: Law Library’s A To Z List

Often a source of intelligent commentary, journal articles can be quite useful when conducting legal research. There are two major sources for journal articles available through the Seattle University Library system: the A to Z List through the Law Library and the Full Text Electronic Journal List through the Lemieux Library.

The Law Library’s A to Z List is an excellent source for those looking for journal articles on any legal topic. The A to Z list allows access to electronic journals available through West, Lexis, Hein, and LegalTrac. The List provides three methods for accessing articles: a journal title search engine, an alphabetical browsing list, and a topical index. Journal coverage primarily focuses on legal topics, including all major law reviews, along with many relevant sources for legal news and cases. For those without Lexis or Westlaw subscriptions, remember that we have access through computers in the Law Library!

Those looking for a useful source of information on all things non-legal should be sure to examine Lemieux’s Full Text Electronic Journal List. Similar in structure to the A to Z list, the Full Text List provides access to journals through a title search engine, an alphabetical list for browsing, and a topical index. The Full Text list includes refereed academic journals on all major subject areas ranging from the arts and humanities to the natural and social sciences. Coverage is quite comprehensive as all of the published issues of many journals are available through the list.

Combined, these two sources should help to meet all of your legal and non-legal journal research needs!

Movies in the Law Library Collection

The Law Library has a selection of popular movies with legal themes available in our collection. Some of the films include: To Kill a Mockingbird, Amistad and The Magdalene Sisters. Our film collection is located in the reserve area of the library and movies are available for check out. You can browse our feature films here. 

Today in Legal History: Volstead Act Passed

The Volstead Act, more popularly known as prohibition, was passed on October 28, 1919.  It was named after Andrew Volstead, the congressman who sponsored the legislation. While at first bans on alcohol were attempted on a state level, it soon became a national movement.

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Noise Level

Throughout the academic year and as we get closer to finals, students seek quiet areas to study, free of ringing phones and personal conversations. Keep in mind that voices carry in study rooms (even when doors are closed) so please be considerate. The 4th floor is a designated quiet study zone.

Bring Your ID Card to Access the Law Library on Evenings and Weekends

library swipeAll law students are required to swipe their SU ID cards after 8pm Monday through Thursday and on Sunday card swipes are required from 7am – 10am and after 4pm. The ID card swipe policy increases security and law student priority in the library.

Library Access Policy

While law students, faculty and staff are Seattle University Law Library’s main constituents, please note that the Law Library is open to all Seattle University faculty, staff, students, and alumni who are engaged in research or studies that require the use of legal material.  Circulation privileges are limited to Seattle University faculty, staff, currently enrolled students, or alumni who purchase library memberships.

Members of the general public can purchase a $5 day pass for access to the Library with no circulation privileges.  Additionally, members of the general public have full access to the United States government documents acquired by the Library through its membership in the Federal Depository Library Program.  All non-law school patrons must show identification at the Circulation Desk and complete the “Visitors’ Registration Form.”

During reading and examination periods, access to the Law Library is limited to law students, alumni, faculty, and researchers with specific collection needs.  The Seattle University Law Library access policy is posted on our website at: http://www.law.seattleu.edu/x3174.xml.

If you have questions about access or unauthorized patrons, please contact the Law Library Circulation staff on the 2nd floor of the library.  Campus public safety can also be contacted: x5990 (non-emergency) or x5911 (emergency).

Have a Question? Ask a Reference Librarian

reference librarianThe reference desk is staffed in person Monday through Wednesday from 8:30am-8pm, Thursday and Friday from 8:30am-4:30pm and via eReference Sundays from noon to 4pm.  You can stop by the reference desk, call 398-4225, or e-mail lawreference@seattleu.edu.