Library

Featured Database: Versus Law

Like Westlaw and Lexis, Versus Law provides an excellent source of information for researchers interested in looking for information on primary sources of law. Versus Law covers appellate cases, statutes and administrative regulations at both the state and federal levels. Additionally, the database covers Federal District Court cases from 1950 to the present. Finally, Versus Law includes a collection of tribal cases from selected tribes located throughout the United States.

Unlike Westlaw or Lexis, Versus Law does not include any annotations in the cases or statutes. While there is no editorial commentary, Versus Law does provide the full text of opinions and statutes, including footnotes.

Information is very easy to access on Versus Law. Researchers can begin by simply clicking on the search tab and then clicking on the type of information that they are looking for. Versus Law allows researchers to search through primary materials by entering terms into a search engine. Additionally, Versus Law allows researchers to search by citation.

Versus Law is a great place to start for researchers without access to Westlaw or Lexis due to cost issues. Full access to all of the databases on Versus Law costs much less than either Westlaw or Lexis. Thus, it is an excellent source for researchers on a budget.


 

Featured Database: The Making of Modern Law

The Making of Modern Law database contains scanned images of over 22,000 legal treatises on British and American law published between 1800 and 1922.  Check out this great historical resource on the library database page.


 

Journal Staff Legal Research Guide

Conducting a Source and Cite Check for a Journal?  Check out the library’s guide for journal staff.  It answers general questions about choosing a topic, preemption checks, locating and borrowing materials, and cite and source checking.


 

Library Tours

Third Floor
What does the law library offer to students? Take a short tour and find out! Tours will last about 30 minutes and will introduce you to our study aids, online and print materials, Document Delivery Center, and lots more. Tours meet at the reference desk inside the library, and are led by a reference librarian. Sign up online today!


 

US Legal System

It’s a little more than just being a bill sitting up here on Capitol Hill; this research guide by Kelly Kunsch is useful for new students or people with a burning interest in Constitutional law, as well as a comparative reference for the differences between state and Federal legal systems as well as Indian legal systems within their respective Nations.


 

Finding Study Aids

Need an overview of a particular area of law or to clarify a particular legal concept?  The law library purchases the following study aid series:

  • West Hornbooks
  • West Nutshells
  • Examples and Explanations
  • Gilbert Law Summaries
  • Emanuel Law Outlines

Current study aids are located in the Reserve collection.  Check the online catalog for specific titles  Study aids are available for 2-hour check out and selected “starred” copies can be checked out for 24 hours.  “Starred” books cannot be renewed.  Fines will accrue for late items at the rate of $1 per hour. If you would like to check out a study aid for 6 weeks, selected copies of older editions of these study aids are located in the Treatise collection for checkout.

The law library is pleased to provide students with this collection.  We hope that students will take care to maintain the collection for the benefit of everyone.  Remember, study aids are just that: aids to your regular study.  They are not a substitute for attending class and reading required material!


 

Locating Past Exams

When you’re studying, it can be really helpful to see sample questions, either from a professor or in the subject matter generally.  This guide by Charity Braceros-Simon shows you where the past exams are, how they are organized, and what you need to know about finding old exams.  Newer exams are placed on TWEN sites at the discretion of faculty members.


 

Cell Phone Use

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The library staff understands that your connection to family, friends, and employers is vital when you are at school, but we also ask that you be courteous to your classmates and set your cell phones to vibrate or at the lowest setting while you are in the library.  If you need to take a phone call, please conduct cell phone conversations outside the library.  Talking in the stairwells is particularly troublesome as voices carry throughout all the floors.


 

Looking at the Law in all 50 States

This guide is a veritable bonanza for legal researchers in finding work that has already been done so you don’t reinvent the wheel.


 

Preemption Check

This guide shows you how to do preemption checks on your potential law review articles, or major scholarly writings which you might be doing for an independent study. A preemption check is much more than just Shepardizing, and this guide tells you how to do it yourself and do it right the first time.