The Non-Dischargeability of Student Loans

A classic research hypothetical given to new law students is “Can debt from student loans be discharged in a bankruptcy proceeding?” After a short amount of research students are horrified to learn that while American Airlines can file for bankruptcy while sitting on $4 billion in the bank, student loan debtors can’t catch a break. A recent 9th Circuit ruling may offer a glimmer of hope.

More information is available at:


 

“Have you checked the catalogue?”

 

While we don’t have an awesome robot to remind you to check what we call the “catalog” (our previous requests have been denied), we do have awesome reference librarians who can also assist you with your research questions. If you are faculty, staff, or student at the law school, you can email or call us. You can also stop by the reference desk on the main floor of the library. We promise not to bite.

25 Vintage Photos of Librarians Being Awesome – Flavorwire


 

Copy Machines

The library has one self-service copy machine located in the reserve area on the 2nd floor. The copy machine accepts change, one and five dollar bills and Seattle University campus cards that have value added to the debit account. Value can be added to your campus card using eAccounts. Additional information is available on the “Campus Card” section of the OIT website. Cost for photocopies is $0.10 when using change and $0.055 when using your ID card.

Contact the circulation staff if you encounter any problems with the copy machine. Circulation staff can add paper and fix minor paper jams but cannot repair the machine. Staff will place a service call if required.


 

“Packaging Yourself for Public Interest Employment”

This article by Professor David Yamada of Suffolk University Law School offers advice to students who are interested in pursuing public interest work. Topics include course selection and career development.


 

Planning on Taking an Independent Study in the Future?

Law students must consult with an “assigned research librarian” for their independent studies.  Librarian assignments are determined by the library administration based on the librarian’s subject specialty, the faculty member supervising the independent study, and librarian workload.  Students who are pursuing independent studies should contact Stephanie Wilson, Head of Reference Services (Second Floor, Room 201G, x4222, wilsons3@seattleu.edu).  To assist students in completing their independent study research, we have created an independent study FAQ.


 

A World of Law Students in the News: Law Student Inspired by ‘Legally Blonde’ Runs for Senate

Mindy Meyer doesn’t pretend to be familiar with the political views of New York’s governor. But that isn’t preventing the 22-year-old Touro College law student from running for a Brooklyn seat on the state senate, in a longshot campaign branded by the color pink, according to the New York Post and a bio page on her campaign website.

In seeking a senate seat, she tells the Post, she is following the same muse that inspired her to matriculate at Touro’s Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center–Elle Woods.

Law Student Says ‘Legally Blonde’ and Rudolph Giuliani Inspired Her to Run for NY Senate Seat

You can also check out Legally Blonde from the law library.


 

Makeup Wells and other Financial Lingo

If you are not sure whether to invest in something that involves a “makeup well” or how to respond to a “bear hug letter” you might start by looking to one of Latham & Watkins three editions of The Book of Jargon®. These handy references are intended to assist members of the financial community in learning (or re-learning) to ‘talk the talk’ of banking, capital markets and project finance. These online portals and iPhone apps are perfect for the recent law school or business graduate, or perhaps not-so recent graduates, or anyone interested in financial terms of art. Find all three online at Latham & Watkins website.


 

Writing Competition: Food and Drug Law

The Food and Drug Law Institute is sponsoring two writing competitions to encourage law students interested in the areas of law that affect food, drugs, animal drugs, biologics, cosmetics, diagnostics, dietary supplements, medical devices and tobacco. Winning papers will be considered for publication in the Food and Drug Law Journal. Submission deadline is May 31, 2012.


 

Printing Overload

When doing online research, it is easy to inadvertently print more material than you intend.  Remember that all of the law school student printers are shared.  That means there are hundreds of students using the same printers.  Next time you print, consider whether you really need everything you are sending to the printer.  Annotations along with statutory text?  Entire chapters of treatises?  After all, while your job prints, everyone else has to wait.  And, of course, lovely forests are being clear-cut.  If you are not sure how large your print job is, ask a reference librarian or your Lexis or Westlaw representative.


 

Requesting Books from Interlibrary Loan

If you are looking for a book and can’t find it in our catalog, you may still be able to borrow it from another library.  Keep in mind that current casebooks and study aids are often kept in non-circulating reserve or reference collections and may not be available for loan. The following steps will help you determine if the book you are looking for is available from another library:

1. Check the Lemieux Library catalog: http://library.seattleu.edu/search~S2/X (You can check the book out yourself)

2. Check Summit, (a consortium of regional academic libraries) http://summit.orbiscascade.org/ (You can check the book out yourself)

3. Check WorldCat (a union catalog of most libraries in the country and some international libraries) http://libguides.seattleu.edu/content.php?pid=93510&sid=697582 (scroll down to the end of the list).

4. If you can only find the book via the WorldCat catalog, fill out an ILL request form available from the Circulation Desk or online at: http://www.law.seattleu.edu/Library/ILL_Form.xml.

Updated: 02.13.14