Posts Tagged ‘law’

  • Today in Legal History: President James A. Garfield Dies, Leading to Famous Insanity Defense Trial

    President James A. Garfield died on September 19, 1881, after serving less than half a year in office. President Garfield died at a New Jersey seaside location, where he was recovering from two bullet wounds he suffered on July 2, 1881. Garfield’s assassin was Charles Guiteau, an attorney, theologian, and rebuffed office seeker. Guiteau insisted […] Read more...
  • Today in Legal History: Bay of Pigs Invasion

    On April 17, 1961, a CIA-backed group of Cuban refugees tried to invade Cuba at the Bay of Pigs. As soon as the party landed, they were met with resistance from Castro’s forces, and promised US air support never materialized. Of the 1,200 exiles trying to recapture their homeland, 100 died and the rest were […] Read more...
  • Check it Out: The Response

    The Response is a 30-minute courtroom drama based on actual transcripts of the Guantánamo Bay military tribunals. This film illustrates the legal and ethical challenges of enemy detention in the war on terror as it brings the viewer inside an administrative hearing to determine whether a devout Muslim engineer from Pakistan should continue to be […] Read more...
  • Today in Legal History: Roosevelt Signs Lend-Lease Program

    The Lend-Lease program was Franklin Roosevelt’s way to circumvent US laws requiring that all sales to foreign governments be made in cash.  Roosevelt strongly believed that the Allied powers needed help.  This program was met with skepticism; some of the provisions of the bill permitted the President to shut down strikes.  However, Great Britain was […] Read more...
  • Today in Legal History: Campbell v. Acuff-Rose Decided

    2 Live Crew was a rap group who recorded a song called “Pretty Woman”. This song was based heavily on a prior work recorded and co-written by Roy Orbison. Orbison’s record label sued for copyright infringement. The Orbison version was a wistful ballad about a lovely woman walking. By contrast, the 2 Live Crew version […] Read more...
  • Today in Legal History: Constitution Goes into Effect

    Work began on the US Constitution in September of 1786. While all states did eventually ratify the Constitution, not all of them did so before the Constitution took effect on March 4, 1789. The Constitution was the result of intense negotiation and compromise. The Bill of Rights was written as part of these negotiations. The Constitutional […] Read more...
  • Today in Legal History: Salem Witch Trials

    On February 29, 1692, the first arrests were made in the Salem Witch Trials. The Salem court of Oyer and Terminer (hear and determine) accepted evidence that no modern court would: spectral evidence and witch marks. Spectral evidence involved reports of what would sound like hallucinations to modern jurors. The witnesses would describe their visions […] Read more...
  • Today in Legal History: Dawes Severalty Act Signed, Tribes Further Dispossessed

    On February 8, 1887, President Grover Cleveland signed the Dawes Act, dividing up tribal lands into plots for individuals to farm.  The effect of the Act was to weaken tribes, break up traditional families, and put Indian lands into non-Indian hands.  Under the Act, farmers did not get ownership of the land for 25 years; […] Read more...
  • Finding Law Review Articles

    Want to find law reviews that offer commentary on socially relevant topics and insights on secondary sources that might help make your research even better?  Trying to locate journal articles so old they don’t show up on Westlaw or Lexis?  This research guide gives you step by step instructions on how to find useful law […] Read more...
  • Today in Legal History: First session of first Supreme Court

    The first Supreme Court met on February 1st, 1790. The first appointees were John Jay (Chief Justice), John Rutledge, William Cushing, John Blair, Robert Harrison, and James Wilson. They met in the Royal Exchange Building in New York. The court would not have real power until John Marshall took over and Marbury v. Madison was […] Read more...