Posts Tagged ‘legal history’

  • Today in Legal History: President James A. Garfield Dies, Leading to Famous Insanity Defense Trial

    President James A. Garfield died on September 19, 1881, after serving less than half a year in office. President Garfield died at a New Jersey seaside location, where he was recovering from two bullet wounds he suffered on July 2, 1881. Garfield’s assassin was Charles Guiteau, an attorney, theologian, and rebuffed office seeker. Guiteau insisted […] Read more...
  • Today in Legal History: Nuremberg Race Laws Went Into Effect In Nazi Germany

    On September 15, 1935, the Nuremberg Laws were adopted.  The Law for the Protection of German Blood and German Honour prohibited marriage between Jews and “Germans” and also prohibited Jewish households from employing “German” women under the age of 45.  The Reich Citizenship Law basically stripped Jews of German citizenship. Learn more about the Nuremberg […] Read more...
  • This Week in Legal History: Attica Prison Riot Ends

    Attica Prison Riot Ends, September 13th 1971 On September 9th, 1971, prisoner’s in New York’s Attica Correctional facility began a riot to demand better living conditions and more human treatment. After four days of violence, taking of hostages and stalled negotiations, the Attica prison riots ended on September 13th when New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller […] Read more...
  • This Week in Legal History: Clinton Affair

    Starr Report Released, September 11th 1998 On September 11, 1998, Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr released the Starr Report, a 455 page report detailing President Clinton’s relationship with Monica Lewinsky. The report concluded with a discussion of eleven potential grounds for impeachment. To learn more see: The Starr Report Richard Posner, An Affair of State : […] Read more...
  • Trial of the Month: John Hinckley Jr. Trial

    In 1981, John Hinckley Jr. attempted to assassinate President Reagan. He shot the President, a police officer, and a Secret Service agent. He also seriously wounded Press Secretary James Brady. The attack was an attempt to gain the affections of Jodie Foster. On August 28, 1981, Hinckley pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity. On […] Read more...
  • Trial of the Month: Menendez Brothers Sentenced

    On July 2, 1996, the Lyle and Erik Menendez were sentenced to life in prison without parole for the brutal murder of their parents. The parents, Jose and Kitty Menendez, were murdered in their home on August 20, 1989. Lyle and Erik were not suspects until 1990, when Erik’s confession to his psychotherapist was revealed. […] Read more...
  • Today in Legal History: Secretary of the Interior J. P. Usher Creates the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation

    On July 8, 1864, Secretary of the Interior J.P. Usher created the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation. For centuries the Salish-speaking people had lived along the Chehalis River in two groups, the Upper and Lower Chehalis, until American settlers arrived. In 1855, the Chehalis groups did not sign the treaties offered by the U.S. […] Read more...
  • Today in Legal History: Independence Day

    On July 4, 1776, the First Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence and ordered it to be printed. The document was drafted by Thomas Jefferson, and served to formally sever ties with Great Britain, declaring the colonies independent. Independence Day celebrations date back to the eighteenth century, but Independence Day, or the Fourth of […] Read more...
  • Today in Legal History: Johnson Signs Civil Rights Act

    On July 2, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law the historic Civil Rights Act, which outlawed segregation in businesses, public places, and banned discriminatory practices in employment.  In 1963, President John F. Kennedy proposed civil rights legislation, and after his assassination, Johnson vowed to carry out civil rights reform.  Passage of the act […] Read more...
  • Source for Researching Legal History

    The Making of Modern Law is a database of 22,000 legal treatises on US and British law published from 1800 through 1926. The database provides researchers access to critical legal history, including casebooks, local practice manuals, form books, works for lay readers, pamphlets, letters, speeches and more. Available on campus to Seattle University students, faculty, […] Read more...