Featured Database: Subject Compilation of State Laws – Fifty State Surveys

Have you ever wondered where to find a comparison of state laws governing the proceeds from the sales of all those lottery tickets you buy hoping to pay off your student loans?  Or how various states’ laws on the use of cell phones while driving compare?  If so, Cheryl Nyberg’s Subject Compilations of State Laws (LAW-Reserve KF1.N93) is the place to start.

Subject Compilations is an annual bibliography that is divided into legal topics as diverse as lotteries, traffic, taxation and hundreds more. This resource provides citations to legal publications (including law review articles, books, court briefs and opinions, federal and state government publications, loose-leaf services and websites) where multi-state information can be found.

In addition to the bound volumes of this set, the law library has a comprehensive searchable database of the entire set available through Hein Online. This database contains references to 50-state surveys and allows you to link directly to journals found within Hein Online or the Web.  The Subject Compilations database is searchable across a number of fields, including subject, journal title, title, creator/author, added authors, court, or entry number (entry numbers are used in cross references and in the author and publisher indexes).  It can be accessed on the library’s subscription database listings, under Hein Online.

Still looking? Westlaw and LexisNexis also offer fifty state survey products.  Additionally, the book, National Survey of State Laws. (LAW-Reserve KF386.N38) provides detailed charts of state legislation on popular topics.  The charts make it easy to compare state approaches.  For assistance, please contact the reference desk at x4225 or lawreference@seattleu.edu.

US Legal System

It’s a little more than just being a bill sitting up here on Capitol Hill; this research guide by Kelly Kunsch is useful for new students or people with a burning interest in Constitutional law, as well as a comparative reference for the differences between state and Federal legal systems as well as Indian legal systems within their respective Nations.

Solo and Small Firm Practice

Many law graduates venture out into the real world in a small or solo practice.  This guide helps you with the basics, like how to start your own law library, keeping a business plan, and deciding where you want to locate your office.  Even if you’re just thinking about starting out solo or small, this guide is a great read about the realities of solo practice.

Researching Legal Careers

The Researching Legal Careers guide points to resources about general career planning and covers career specialties such as elder law or tax law. You can also learn about business etiquette and how to interview successfully. Look for it under the library’s Guides tab.

Legal Research Tune-Up

The Seattle University and Lane Powell law firm law libraries are pleased to offer a legal research workshop to help students brush up on their legal research skills for their summer employment or other summer research endeavors. The workshop will cover state and federal legislative history, regulations, and practice materials using a problem-based approach. Students will have hands-on practice working through research scenarios. Please bring your laptop.
The workshop is free and will be held on Wednesday May 20th from 9:30 – 11:30 am in Sullivan Hall room 109. Coffee and breakfast snacks will be provided. Please RSVP by May 18th.
Questions? Contact: Barbara Swatt Engstrom engstromb@seattleu.edu

Featured Database: CALI Lessons

As you are starting your new classes, we’d like to remind you about CALI lessons.  If you are unfamiliar, CALI lessons are interactive, computer-based tutorials on a wide range of legal subject areas.  Lessons are completely free for our law students. They are useful for mastering material during the semester and for exam preparation.

When registering a new CALI account, you must use our school’s authorization code to create the account. You can get the authorization code at the Reference Desk. You only need to use this authorization code once. After that, you will use the email and password you created when you signed up.  CDs with the lessons are also available at the Reference Desk.

Learning New Research Systems

studyingThe Library makes many different research platforms available to students–Blackboard, Casemaker, Lexis, Hein Online and Westlaw—to name just a few. Take advantage of your free access during law school and learn to use these platforms. On each system, look for tutorials, help screens and videos to help you get the most out of them.

Researching Indian and Tribal Law

Sitting BullReference Librarian Kelly Kunsch recently published an article on researching Indian and Tribal Law in the American Indian Law Journal. He cleverly titled it “A Legal Practitioner’s Guide to Indian and Tribal Law Research.

Human Trafficking Research

The Polaris Project offers a broad selection of resources for various actors within the anti-human trafficking movement. The site includes statistics, statutes, and pending legislation.

Featured Database: LLMC Digital

Are you looking for images of historical documents from national and state archives? The LLMC Digital database presently has scanned images of historical legal materials, including cases, statutes, reports, treatises, and dictionaries.  Check out this database on our Databases page.