Library

Check in with Tilman Larson

This summer, we would like to share a series of profiles on our former library interns and alumni of Seattle University School Law. We love to hear what they’re up to!


Where do you work and what is your role?
I am an associate attorney at the Law Offices of John M. Hyams. My career path to this point has been a non-traditional path. When I graduated from SU, I had been hired by Thomson Reuters to work as a Westlaw Account Manager in Pennsylvania. I worked in this position for about 6 ½ years before the company went through a major reorganization and eliminated several positions, including mine. By that point, I had taken and passed the Pennsylvania Bar. So I opened up my own law firm and worked as a solo practitioner until July of 2016. I then merged my firm with the Law Offices of John M. Hyams.

What do you enjoy most about your job?
Court room experience. I practice Family Law, Criminal Defense, aspects of Bankruptcy, Unemployment Compensation, Employment Law, Landlord / Tenant Law, Estate Planning and Administration, Business Law, and some civil litigation matters. Much of my work requires drafting pleadings, motions, and being in court. Although being in court can sometimes be terrifying, the thrill of presenting evidence, examining and cross-examining witnesses, and hearing the judge rule on the merits is also very exhilarating.

What did you do before law school, and what led to you pursue a law degree?
Prior to law school, I worked as an inventory specialist as a local hospital. On a part-time basis, I was also an assistant track coach for a local high school team. My pursuit of a law degree began when I was in 9th grade after taking a personality test. My number 2 profession was Attorney. However, I really didn’t think about that again until about two years before graduating from college. At that time a very good friend had just taken the LSAT and encouraged me to pursue a law degree because of its versatility in the business profession. Having not had much success in securing an internship or work generally in my field of study, I began studying for the LSAT. And the rest is history in the making.

What have you found most valuable during your law school education?
The training and now ability to look for solutions to a problem from all perspectives.

What advice do you have for SU students or grads?
Network. Network. Network. It sounds so cliché, but it really is true. You really never know where one simple connection may lead you. I did not expect an invitation to lunch from my current employer while I was a solo practitioner to discuss the possibility of merging firms. And at that time I was simply looking to network and possibly connect with him for referrals.

What was your most memorable experience in the library or at SU generally?
In the library, I really enjoyed researching and working on the history of the Bluebook exhibit that was displayed for a short period of time. At SU generally, I really enjoyed simply associating with such a diverse and brilliant group of peers and colleagues, whether that was in class, studying with them, or socializing with them outside of SU.


 

Check in with Katie Brown

This summer, we would like to share a series of profiles on our former library interns and alumni of Seattle University School Law. We love to hear what they’re up to!


Where do you work and what is your role?
Charleston School of Law, Deputy Director of the Law Library

What do you enjoy most about your job?
That it is different every single day. One day in the library could have me teaching, managing student employees and other librarians, meeting with the dean, performing faculty research, gathering statistics or writing a survey or blog post. I recently took over the Instagram feed for the library and I am having a blast as it taps into my passion for both photography and social media marketing.

What did you do before law school, and what led to you pursue a law degree?
I was an acting teacher in the suburbs of Chicago. I loved teaching but I was a bit lost in my career. The school where I taught had an attorney on staff that handled grant writing and all things IP. We started talking and he planted the seed that I may be interested in becoming an entertainment attorney. As the year went on I decided law school was the next step for me. I moved back home to Maine for a year to save money and get my applications together and after that year I found myself moving across the country to Seattle, Washington.

What have you found most valuable during your law school education?
This is going to be an odd answer…my opportunities in law school helped me to discover that I did not want to be an attorney. Through experiences with Washington Lawyers for the Arts, the Law Library, Choices conference, the art clinic and candid conversations with professors I learned I was not happy performing “attorney tasks” and that I could use my JD as a dual degreed librarian. I truly love what I do and if not for the opportunities in law school, I could very easily be miserable today as a practicing attorney.

What advice do you have for SU students or grads?
Listen to your inner voice, don’t be afraid to ask questions, and take risks you will learn so much more when you don’t operate from fear. Finally, for those trying to get a job, remember you are interviewing them as much as they are interviewing you. What looks good on paper may not be the ideal job in reality.

What was your most memorable experience in the library or at SU generally?
In general I gained some wonderful mentors. One specific project that still brings me joy when I think about it was the Brown v. Board exhibit. That project was a behemoth, but I learned a great deal and in the end had a really cool visual piece to display in the library.


 

Alumni Services

Congratulations to our December graduates! We encourage you to continue using the law library for your information needs and research interests.

Alumni services include:
• In-house use of law library materials
• Reference services including in person, by telephone (206-398-4225) and via e-mail at lawreference@seattleu.edu.
• In-house use of Law Library and Lemieux Library non-restricted electronic databases
• In-house use of Westlaw Public Patron database on designated computer terminals; no printing available but materials may be emailed or downloaded
• In-house use of audio-visual equipment

Alumni who purchase an annual $25 borrowing membership have access to additional services including:
• Ability to borrow up to five titles at a time
• Loan periods of 30 days

Alumni do not have access to:
• Document delivery
• Interlibrary loans
• Restricted databases, such as Westlaw (except as indicated above) and Lexis
• Printing


 

SU Law School Alumni Magazine

The Lawyer is the law school’s official magazine published for alumni and friends of the school. Its name has changed over the years — Puget Sound Lawyer, Seattle Lawyer —  but now it is simply, The Lawyer. There are archived copies on SU’s digital commons website. If you’re an alum (or a someday alum) and want to see what was going on at the law school in bygone days, it’s the place to go. There are plenty of pictures and the clothing and hairstyles are worth checking out.


 

Law Library Alumni Services

Congratulations to our December graduates! We encourage you to continue using the law library for your information needs and research interests.  Alumni services include:

Alumni who purchase an annual $25 borrowing membership have access to additional services including:

For more specific information on alumni borrowing memberships and membership form, go to: http://www.law.seattleu.edu/Library/Services/Alumni.xml

Alumni do not have access to:

  • Document delivery
  • Interlibrary loans
  • Restricted databases, such as Westlaw and Lexis except as indicated above
  • Printing

If you are interested in subscribing to online databases after graduation, in addition to contacting Westlaw, Lexis, and Bloomberg about pricing plans, you might also consider other online vendors such as Versus Law at: http://www.versuslaw.com, LOIS Law at: http://www.loislaw.com, or Fastcase: http://www.fastcase.com/.  Casemaker is available for free to members of the Washington State bar: http://www.wsba.org/Resources-and-Services/Casemaker-and-Legal-Research.  The library does not recommend any particular vendor over another and the above list is just a sampling of possible online database vendors.  We encourage you to investigate all of your options and find a plan that works best for your practice needs.

If you find yourself having to purchase materials for a library, you may want to consult The Legal Information Buyer’s Guide and Reference Manual by Kendall Svengalis (KF1.S84 Reference Desk) for detailed information on cost effective purchasing options and suggestions for specific materials.  For those of you setting up a solo or small firm practice, you might take a look at our Solo & Small Firm Practice Resources guide at: http://lawlibguides.seattleu.edu/solo.

Updated from November 22, 2013


 

Clearing the Bar

Congratulations from the library to SU Law alumni (and I suppose non-alumni as well) for finishing the Washington State Bar exam on July 29th. You had as good a summer as any for studying.