Posts Tagged ‘U.S. Constitution’

  • Today in Legal History: Confederate Constitution Adopted

    The Confederate Constitution, adopted on┬áMarch 11, 1861, provides an interesting insight into the political opinions of the South during the antebellum period. While much of the Confederate version is clearly taken straight from the US Constitution, there are differences. The President is limited to a single six year term, for example. The Bill of Rights […] Read more...
  • Today in Legal History: Constitution Goes into Effect

    Work began on the US Constitution in September of 1786. While all states did eventually ratify the Constitution, not all of them did so before the Constitution took effect on March 4, 1789. The Constitution was the result of intense negotiation and compromise. The Bill of Rights was written as part of these negotiations.┬áThe Constitutional […] Read more...
  • Today in Legal History: U.S. Term Limits v. Thornton

    The state of Arkansas imposed term limitations through Amendment 73, a ballot measure that prohibited the listing of any person who served the maximum terms allowed in the U. S. House or Senate on the general election ballot. Soon after the measure was adopted in 1992, Bobbie Hill, the League of Women Voters, and U.S. […] Read more...
  • Historic U.S. Documents: Researching the Constitution

    The Library of Congress hosts “A Century of Lawmaking For a New Nation. U.S. Congressional Documents and Debates 1774-1875.” Among its treasures are constitutional debates such as those found in “Elliot’s Debates” and “Farrand’s Records.” Ten years ago you would have needed to go to a law library to look at these volumes. Now you […] Read more...